Massachusetts should raise its net energy metering caps

Massachusetts State HouseA recent article in pv magazine states that “Massachusetts is at a crossroads. To keep the state’s solar market moving, the Massachusetts State Legislature must raise the state’s net energy metering caps before the year is out. Despite progress being made to finalize the new incentive program by the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER), called Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART), the Legislature must act to keep support for solar projects intact.”

According to the article, “Massachusetts policies have helped create nearly 15,000 solar jobs in Massachusetts. That is an impressive number, but it’s also a mere fraction of what’s possible with a long-term, stable NEM policy in place. Furthermore, these policies have made the Bay State a national leader in solar. Massachusetts now ranks 7th in cumulative solar capacity installed, with enough solar energy to power 244,000 Massachusetts homes. All of that solar is lowering customer bills, reducing pollution and helping the Commonwealth meet its electricity needs.”

Massachusetts residents can contact their state reps and senators and tell them to support raising the net metering caps to keep Massachusetts economy moving forward in the right direction.  To find your elected representatives contact info, go to this link.

Community Solar comes to the Berkshires

There was another recent good article about the benefits of community solar in Franklin County’s daily newspaper, The Recorder, in Greenfield, Massachusetts, one of the oldest newspapers in the country. It states, “Instead of growing food crops, it’s growing energy – solar energy. Just as community-sustained agriculture is gaining prominence, this solar farm is supporting and is supported by the local community. The state of Massachusetts has a program to make sure that local residents benefit from this new sort of agriculture, called Community Solar.”

It goes on to point out that this opportunity is limited, “Perhaps the biggest restriction is that this program and this Community Solar Farm have limited availability. The end of this program has been announced. There is likely to be a follow-on program, but it’s designed to have smaller incentives as these Community Solar Farms become more prevalent. So, once this one’s full, it’s not clear when the next Community Solar Farm might be built and whether the financial incentive will be this good. Customers who get in now stand to benefit for the life of the solar farm. Customers are placed on a first-come, first-served basis.

To learn all the details about this special program click here and you can schedule a no-obligation discussion…”

April customer success stories

As a renter with electric heat Jacoby was excited for #communitysolar to save money & use clean local energy #solarisworking @relay_power

 

Barbara & Danny are going solar without removing trees around their home that they love #communitysolar #solarisworking @relay_power

 

Jon is using local clean energy and saving money electricity every month #communitysolar #solarisworking @relay_power

 

George can’t do rooftop solar but he is saving with #communitysolar through @relaypower #solarisworking

 

This is a great idea. I don’t know why anyone wouldn’t do this. -Stan & Rosemary #solarisworking #communitysolar @relay_power

 

Living in a pine forest and possibly moving to CA in a few years makes #communitysolar from @relaypower a good fit for John #solarisworking

 

Living in the shade of a forest is not keeping Susan from going solar. She’s working with Relay Power to use community solar.

 

Living in Berkshires & working in public health, Barbara values #cleanair & #communitysolar is easy no brainer @relay_power #solarisworking

Community Solar Farm Brings Jobs and Choice

A recent article in the Daily Hampshire Gazette, notes that, “According to the Department of Energy, Solar now employs 374,000 workers, or 43 percent of the electric power generation workforce, almost twice as many as employed by all fossil fuel generation including coal, oil, and natural gas generation technologies combined.”

This shows the power of Community Solar to bring jobs as well as choice to area residents.  And of course, it also notes, “To learn all the details about this special program click here and you can schedule a no-obligation discussion with a representative of Relay Power, whose job it is to connect residents with this Community Solar Farm.”

 

March customer success stories

Jacob & family are in #communitysolar for #cleanair and local jobs #solarisworking @relay_power

Jacob & family are in #communitysolar for #cleanair and local jobs #solarisworking @relay_power

 

It came down to #cleanair and #actonclimate for Scarlet & Jayme when deciding to do #communitysolar w @relay_power #solarisworking

It came down to #cleanair and #actonclimate for Scarlet & Jayme when deciding to do #communitysolar w @relay_power #solarisworking

 

Kua Hoag welcomed #communitysolar from @relay_power to his home #solarisworking

Kua Hoag welcomed #communitysolar from @relay_power to his home #solarisworking

 

As engineer Val knows the #solarisworking and now #communitysolar w/ @relay_power is working for her family

As engineer Val knows the #solarisworking and now #communitysolar w/ @relay_power is working for her family

February customer success stories

#communitysolar with @relay_power comes down to #cleanair and local jobs for Stephanie and Steve.

#communitysolar with @relay_power comes down to #cleanair and local jobs for Stephanie and Steve.

 

Don likes the idea of clean energy but really wants to save money and he will be saving $350 each year with #communitysolar & @relay_power

Don likes the idea of clean energy but really wants to save money and he will be saving $350 each year with #communitysolar & @relay_power

 

Paul knows #solarisworking & saving his family $$. Paul & his family are using #communitysolar through a solar farm through @relay_power

Paul knows #solarisworking & saving his family $$. Paul & his family are using #communitysolar through a solar farm through @relay_power

 

I don't know why you wouldn't do #communitysolar, it's a win-win for everybody -Liang #solarisworking @relay_power

I don’t know why you wouldn’t do #communitysolar, it’s a win-win for everybody -Liang #solarisworking @relay_power

 

Tim is achieving his goal of offsetting his entire electric bill with #communitysolar from @relay_power #solarisworking

Tim is achieving his goal of offsetting his entire electric bill with #communitysolar from @relay_power #solarisworking

 

Mike and Kathy are into #communitysolar for the local clean energy and saving them money @relay_power #solarisworking

Mike and Kathy are into #communitysolar for the local clean energy and saving them money @relay_power #solarisworking

January customer success stories

Congrats Donna, Davis & Ben in Northborough for going #communitysolar with @relay_power

 

Spencer, Amy, and kids are excited for #communitysolar with @relay_power #solarisworking

Spencer, Amy, and kids are excited for #communitysolar with @relay_power #solarisworking

 

Welcome Ron & Janet to #CommunitySolar & @relay_power Fits perfectly with their rooftop solar to give their home 100% solar & max discount

Welcome Ron & Janet to #CommunitySolar & @relay_power Fits perfectly with their rooftop solar to give their home 100% solar & max discount

 

Sandy & Jack wanted to help local economy & jobs. They did that with #communitysolar with @relay_power #solarisworking

Sandy & Jack wanted to help local economy & jobs. They did that with #communitysolar with @relay_power #solarisworking

 

Bruce & Sandy want a livable climate for their grandkids so they are doing #communitysolar with @relay_power #actonclimate #solarisworking

Bruce & Sandy want a livable climate for their grandkids so they are doing #communitysolar with @relay_power #actonclimate #solarisworking

 

Another MA family going solar for clean air with @relay_power #solarisworking #ActOnClimate

Another MA family going solar for clean air with @relay_power #solarisworking #ActOnClimate

 

Analysis Shows That Community Solar Is Competitive in the Vast Majority of the US

Greentech Media recently reported that, “Solar power is now more affordable in the United States than at any other point in history…
In particular, community solar projects are gaining popularity, as they allow the almost half of U.S. households that may not have access to a “solar-ready” roof to take advantage of the sun’s energy and do it at a lower cost. This can make solar accessible to more low- and moderate-income (LMI) communities. Between 2010 and 2015, community solar installations grew rapidly, reaching almost 100 megawatts — and this business model has even greater potential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimates community solar could comprise up to half of the distributed PV market in 2020….

New solar data analysis from NREL explores the affordability of solar using a “savings to investment” (SIR) ratio. This metric captures the ability to recover one’s investment in solar based on the utility bill savings resulting from the solar energy generated by a given solar energy system. NREL conducted a simple SIR analysis for all 50 states by assuming that U.S. residential PV systems today cost between $3.00 per watt and $3.50 per watt and last 25 to 35 years. In this scenario, it could be cost-effective for households to make a shift to solar in a quarter to half of states without any state or local incentives.

Because community solar projects are often larger and can take advantage of bulk pricing, their installed costs are more in-line with commercial solar systems, which cost approximately $2.00 per watt to $2.50 per watt. Holding everything else constant, the number of states in the analysis with positive SIRs increases to 35-48 states with these lower installed costs, which means solar energy is potentially affordable in the vast majority of the country through the community solar business model.

Though this is a very basic analysis, it illustrates that solar is quickly becoming one of the most cost-effective sources of energy for all Americans, regardless of where they live.

However, a recent report by the George Washington University Solar Institute shows that while 49.1 million households earn less than $40,000 of income per year and make up 40 percent of all U.S. households, they only account for less than 5 percent of solar installations. Providing the means for all communities to benefit from solar energy will help the U.S. meet its climate goals while also helping to create a fair market for solar that allows everyone, regardless of where they live or their financial status, to benefit from clean energy.

The enormous opportunity to expand solar electricity access to LMI households is why the SunShot Initiative launched the Solar in Your Community Challenge. Building on the recent White House announcement of the Clean Energy Savings for All Initiative, the challenge will enable the expansion of the solar market to a diverse array of new consumers, especially LMI households and nonprofit, community-serving organizations. Given the analysis from NREL, we have high hopes that the Solar in Your Community Challenge will be the starting point for a solar revolution among new populations…”

Hancock Shaker Village getting greener: Community Solar project underway

The Berkshire Eagle reported on another Community Solar Project that Relay Power is helping customers connect to:

hancocksolar1

Construction of a community solar project is well underway to benefit Eversource customers throughout Western Massachusetts.

The three separate solar arrays being installed on the grounds of Hancock Shaker Village should be completed around Jan. 1 and hopefully operational early next year, according to Syncarpha Solar LLC.

The New York City-based firm, partnered with Renewable Energy Massachusetts, will have a 1-megawatt array on the Pittsfield-side of the living museum along Route 20 and two, 2-megawatt facilities in the town of Hancock.

Collectively, the solar energy generating system will feed the electricity produced into the Eversource power grid, and the three array ownership entities would be set up as Community Shared Solar facilities.

That means residents of the Berkshires who are Eversource customers can buy energy net-metering credits at a discount and realize energy savings, project officials have said.

“You can subscribe for net-metering credits before [the project] is up and running,” said Matt Preskenis, Syncarpha’s vice president of community solar.

Syncarpha’s plan is to target residential customers of Eversource, and also municipalities or educational institutions to contract for the remaining credits

Hancock Shaker Village also makes money off the project as the developers’ facilities would provide lease income for the museum for up to a 30-year period.

“All [27 acres] of the leased land is outside the viewshed of the restored Shaker village,” said acting board of trustees Chairman, Richard Seltzer in a statement. “This environmentally sound use of land is consistent with Shaker ideals and will contribute rents which will facilitate the educational mission of Hancock Shaker Village.”

The developers plan to install at least a seven-foot fence around the arrays and properly screen the Pittsfield site with natural vegetation to minimize the visual impact to neighbors across Route 41.

Syncarpha views the Pittsfield/Hancock solar arrays in keeping with the museum’s mission of sustainability.

“It really goes along with the value of the Shakers,” said project developer Keith Akers.

Preskenis added, “The projects we get most excited about are the tones that work well and align with our customer’s philosophy.”

For information on the Hancock Shaker Village solar project, go to www.syncarpha.solar.